Healthy Living with Diabetes

Healthy Living with Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic, life-long, on-going condition. While you may see a physician or another health care provider several times a year, most days you are the one who controls your diabetes through monitoring, nutrition, exercise and managing your symptoms. Healthy Living with Diabetes is a researched and proven program designed to help you do that.

What is Healthy Living with Diabetes?

This workshop is designed to help adults with type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes learn self-management skills and increase their confidence in managing their diabetes. The workshop meets once a week for six weeks — 2-1/2 hours each session. Healthy Living with Diabetes complements existing treatments a participant receives.

 

Who should take the workshop?

  • +Adults with type 2 diabetes,
  • +Adults with pre-diabetes, or
  • +Adults living with someone who has diabetes

People who take this workshop:

  • +Learn techniques to deal with the symptoms of diabetes.
  • +Learn about appropriate exercise, use of medication, and healthy eating.
  • +Report improved health, health behavior, and a sense of confidence in managing their diabetes.
  • +Show improvements in blood sugar levels and a decrease in health distress and hypo- and hyperglycemia.
  • +Feel more confident in their ability to communicate with physicians.
  • +Have fewer doctor and emergency room visits and fewer hospitalizations.

Did you know?

  • +One of every 12 Americans is affected by diabetes.
  • +In Wisconsin, there are 475,000 adults with diabetes and 1.45 million adults with pre-diabetes.
  • +The risk of death amoung people with diabetes is about twice that of people without diabetes of similar age.
  • +Diabetes is leading cause of blindness, heart disease and stroke, and amputation of lower extremeties.
  • +Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death nationally.
  • +Diabetes is a very expensive disease to treat: direct hospital and other medical costs of $4.07 billion and indirect costs (e.g., lost wages) of $2.7 billion (2009 data for WI)