About ADRC

How much do ADRC services cost?

Q: How much do ADRC services cost?

A: The information and assistance provided to you is at no cost. The services or programs that you are referred to may charge a fee.

Do I have to give my name?

Q: Do I have to give my name?

A: No, you do not have to give your name to the ADRC when you call.

Do I have to come to the office?

Q: Do I have to come to the office?

A: No, you can call or email the ADRC or request the ADRC staff to come to your home for a home visit. The staff will also meet you at a location that you choose.

Do I have to let ADRC staff come to my home?

A: Do I have to let ADRC staff come to my home?

Q: That is up to you: ADRC staff will come to your home, speak to you over the phone, meet you in a private office in the ADRC, or meet you at a location that you choose.

Can the ADRC make recommendations?

Q: Can the ADRC make recommendations towards specific companies or professionals?

A: No, we cannot. We strongly recommend that when considering hiring a company or person to provide services that you interview them also ask for references from other customers. There are public resources that can aide you in checking the backgrounds such as Wisconsin Circuit Court Access. Check out all of the options not every company/person is a good fit for everyone.

Worried?

I’m worried about my mother living alone

Q: I’m worried about my mother living alone – I suspect she’s not eating and taking her medications as she should. What can I do?

A: We can help sort through your concerns, identify the problems, link you with services and discuss possible options for you and your mother. Call us at 877-794-2372 and talk with one of our experts who can offer you free and unbiased information.

I’m having surgery...

Q: I’m having surgery and I’m worried that I won’t be able to prepare my own meals while I’m recuperating. Is there help available to me? A: Call the ADRC to learn more about meal programs in your area which can help out until you’re back on your feet.

I have an elderly neighbor who I’m very worried about.

Q: I have an elderly neighbor who I’m very worried about. I don’t want to intrude on her privacy, but I’m afraid she’s not taking care of herself and something bad might happen. What should I do?”

A: You can help her without invading her privacy by calling the Aging & Disability Resource Center for information and services that you can provide to her.

I suspect that someone I know is being abused...

Q: I suspect that someone I know is being abused. He is dependent on others for help and he’s vulnerable, but he’ll never “tell” on the person who is taking advantage of him. What can I do?

A: You need to contact the Adult Protective Services Agency in your county (Grant County: 608-732-2136, Green County: 608-328-9393, Iowa County: 608-930-9801, Lafayette County: 608-776-4800)

I don’t think my mother should be living by herself anymore...

Q: I don’t think my mother should be living by herself anymore.  What options are available for her and how do I get started with finding a suitable living environment?”

A:  The Information and Assistance Specialists at the ADRC are able to discuss different options, including home modifications to make the home safer, adaptive medical equipment, home-delivered meals, home care services brought into the home, assisted living facilities and nursing homes.

I have an elderly neighbor who I’m very worried about...

Q: I have an elderly neighbor who I’m very worried about. I don’t want to intrude on her privacy, but I’m afraid she’s not taking care of herself and something bad might happen. What should I do?

A: You can help her without invading her privacy by calling the Aging & Disability Resource Center. We can offer suggestions for elderly care services and programs to help you help her continue living as independently and as safely as possible.

General

Assistance for simple household tasks or minor home repairs...

Q: Is there assistance for someone who needs help with simple household tasks or minor home repairs?

A: The ADRC will provide you with resources and services that are reliable and trustworthy.

Who can I talk to about memory concerns?

Q: Who can I talk to about memory concerns?

A: Contact your local ADRC for resources in your area.

How does someone get durable medical equipment?

Q: How does someone get durable medical equipment?

A: Individuals who need the equipment short term may contact to the ADRC to learn about any available resources that can assist you.

I want to remain in my own home...

Q: I want to remain in my own home, but I need a little help. What services are available
to me?

A: It is very possible for you to remain in your own home and there are a number of options to help you out. You should call and speak with an information and assistance specialist at your local Aging & Disability Resource Center to discuss your options.

My vision is making it hard...

Q: My vision is making it hard for me to do things around the house. Is there anything available that can help me?

A: You can contact your local rehabilitation specialist from the state office for the blind and visually impaired. They can come to your home and help adapt your home to make is safer and easier for you. Call your local ADRC for their number.

Disability

I would like to apply for Social Security benefits...

Q: I believe I have a disability and would like to apply for Social Security benefits. Where do I start?

A: You can start by contacting the ADRC to learn more about the application process. The ADRC has a staff person who can assist with the application process or they can tell you how you can apply on your own if you would like.

What is a guardianship?

Q: What is a guardianship?

A: It is a legal relationship created by the county circuit (probate) court so that the guardian can make a defined decision on behalf of a person who has been deemed incompetent, who therefore cannot make decisions for themselves. You can go to the WI Guardianship Support Center for more information.

Where can I get help finding a job?

Q: Where can I get help finding a job since my disability keeps me from being able to fulfill the duties of my job?

A: The local ADRC can help you connect with agencies that can help you find work or can help you get the retraining you need to get back working.

My special needs child will be turning 18 this year...

Q: My special needs child will be turning 18 this year.  What needs to be put in place before he/she turns 18?

A: There are many things to consider as your child becomes an adult. The ADRC can talk with you about your situation, what current benefits you have, current services you are using and explain how these will look once your child is an adult. There may also be additional services that your child will be eligible for, that he or she was not as a child. The ADRC has a Transition Booklet that can be helpful in explaining terminology, services, and timelines.

Disability/Elder

What is an adult day center?

Q: What is an adult day center?

A:  Adult day care is a group program in which elderly and disabled adults can spend a few hours on a daily basis away from home. They participate in activities, exercise, eat lunch and socialize in a safe, supervised setting while their family caregiver gets a break. There is an affordable daily fee and transportation provided. Green County has an Adult Day Care if you are in need other respite services call your local ADRC for more information.

Elder

I don’t understand the Medicare...

Q: I don’t understand the Medicare Part D plan and Senior Care – what’s the difference and which is the best for me?

A: Call the ADRC for information on prescription drug plans. If you are 60 or older, you can schedule an appointment with one of our Elder Benefit Specialists and if you are under 60 and disabled, you can schedule an appointment with one of our Disability Benefit Specialists.

Does Medicare pay for in-home help?

Q: Does Medicare pay for in-home help?

A: Only when it follows a hospitalization and is ordered by a doctor, and even then it is limited. Most in-home help is paid for out of your own pocket. If you are lower income, talk to your local ADRC, there may be other sources of financial assistance.

I would like to retire within a few months...

Q: I would like to retire within a few months.  How do I sign up for social security?

A: You may go to Social Security’s website:  www.ssa.gov and actually do an on-line application.  You should do this about 3 months before you would like to retire.  The local social security office will call you after your online application is received and complete the form with you in a telephone interview.  If you do not have access to a computer, you may call the Social Security office at 608-723-4125 to set up a phone interview.

How do I get signed up for Medicare and will I need other insurance with Medicare?

Q: I am turning 65 soon. How do I get signed up for Medicare and will I need other insurance with Medicare?

A: If you are already collecting social security, you will receive a Medicare card with an enrollment date for Medicare Part A and Part B about 2 months prior to turning 65.   Coverage will begin the first of the month in which you turn 65.  Medicare will only pay 80% of your medical costs, so it is important to look at either a Medigap policy to cover the remaining 20%, or privatize your Medicare with a HMO or other Advantage Plan.

I am having problems with my insurance covering...

Q: I am having problems with my insurance covering some of my medical bills.  Where can I get help understanding Medicare claims and Part D coverage?

A: The Elder Benefit Specialist at the ADRC can assist with straightening out most claims.

Should I use the state’s prescription drug program (SeniorCare) or a federal Part D plan?

Q: I am turning 65.  Should I use the state’s prescription drug program (SeniorCare) or a federal Part D plan?

A: The state’s plan is $30 a year and drug co-payment costs are dependent upon yearly income. SeniorCare is available only to people who are 65 and older, while a Part D plan is available to anyone receiving Medicare.  A part D plan has a monthly fee and can be a stand alone plan or can be built into an Advantage Plan.  Individuals with low income and low assets may qualify for extra help (Low Income Subsidy – LIS) with the plan and drug co-payments.  Most co-payments under the LIS are less costly than through SeniorCare.  For individuals who are taking expensive prescription drugs, SeniorCare can be taken along with a Part D plan and may help an individual pay for drugs when they reach the gap that requires 100% cost out of pocket.

I have been placed on a new medication that is not covered...

Q: I have been placed on a new medication that is not covered by my prescription drug plan.  May I change plans anytime?

A: People who are on LIS may choose a different plan anytime during the year.  Open enrollment is available from October 15 through December 7th of every year for everyone.  It is important to review your plan during the open enrollment period to determine whether you are still in the most cost effective plan for the next year.  Insurance companies do look at their bottom line each year and will raise monthly rates along with co-payments if their profit margin is not where they would like it to be.

How can I help someone get on Medicare Part D?

Q: How can I help someone get on Medicare Part D?

A: You can go to Medicare’s website, www.medicare.gov. The links there can help you find a Medicare Part D plan. You can also call the ADRC and speak with a benefits specialist who can explain the options of the Medicare Part D plan so you and your loved one can make a more informed decision.

What can I do about my Medicare Part D plan...

Q: What can I do about my Medicare Part D plan that suddenly stopped covering one of my medications?

A: You can contact the benefits specialists at your local ADRC or call the Disability Drug Help Line at 1-800-926-4862 or the Medicare Part D Information Line at 1-800-633-4227 for help with this issue.

Caregiver

I have become the caregiver for my father...

Q: I have become the caregiver for my father who has Alzheimer’s Disease, and at times, I don’t feel like I know what I’m doing. I think I need help, but don’t want to be a burden. What can I do?

A: Rest assured that you are not alone the ADRC can assess your situation, offer suggestions for assistance, and connect you with other caregiver resources that are available in your area.

I need a break from taking care of my spouse...

Q: I need a break from taking care of my spouse. What are my options?

A: Options vary depending on where you live. There are agencies that provide supportive home care whose employees would come to your home, adult day services, or hiring someone privately. Contact your local ADRC for more specific information and assistance.

Is there someone I can talk to about caring for my family member?

Q: Is there someone I can talk to about caring for my family member?

A: Yes, our information & assistance specialist can speak with you about your specific need and help you find information about services and programs that would be the most beneficial for your family.

Transportation

How do I get around if I cannot drive?

Q: How do I get around if I cannot drive?

A: There are many options depending on where you live. Call your local ADRC to find out what options are available to you.

I may need to give up driving within a few months...

Q: I may need to give up driving within a few months, what transportation options are available to me?

A: Please see our Transportation Page for all the different transportation schedules, including shuttles and Driver Escort Program.

Assisted Living

How do I know which assisted living facility is right for me?

Q: How do I know which assisted living facility is right for me?

A: All assisted living facilities combine housing with services to help people remain as independent as possible. Call your local ADRC for a list of assisted living facilities in your area. There are three types of assisted living; adult family home, community based residential facility (CBRF) and residential care apartment complex (RCAC).

How do residents pay for their care and services in assisted living?

Q: How do residents pay for their care and services in assisted living?

A: Medicare does not cover services in an assisted living facility. Payments may come from a variety of sources, including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Personal Resources: Including savings accounts, pensions, insurance, veterans care benefits, or Social Security and related benefits such as SSI and SSI-E.
  • State and Federal Funding: For home and community based long term care may be available for eligible participants through a state program entitled “Family Care”. For more information, contact your local ADRC before moving into an assisted living facility.
What services can I expect from an assisted living facility?

Q: What services can I expect from an assisted living facility?

A: Assisted living facilities are required to provide or arrange these five basic services to all residents, if needed including health monitoring, assistance with medications, information and referral services, leisure time services, and personal care services such as help with dressing, eating, bathing, grooming, toileting and mobility.

Social Security

Social Security says I’ve been overpaid—what should I do?

Q: Social Security says I’ve been overpaid—what should I do?

A: Contact your local ADRC to discuss your situation with the Elder Benefits Specialist or the Disability Benefits Specialist. They can explain your choices and help you file an appeal or a waiver request.

My child’s been on SSI and now that he’s turned 18...

Q: My child’s been on SSI and now that he’s turned 18, Social Security says he’s no longer disabled. What can I do about this?

A: You can contact the Disability Benefits Specialist at your local ADRC. He or she can find out why he’s no longer getting SSI, may advocate for your child, and can assist you in filing appeals.

My sister gets only a small Social Security disability check...

Q: My sister gets only a small Social Security disability check and wants to know about getting SSI as well.

A: SSI disability is a program for people who have very low income and very limited assets, not counting the house a person lives in and one car. Your sister can contact the Social Security office to apply for SSI.

Nutrition

What are the eligibility requirements for home delivered meals?

Q: What are the eligibility requirements for home delivered meals?

A: The meal program is funded by the Older Americans Act, which requires that participating individuals be age 60 and older.  A person must also unable to get out of the house for normal activities.  Some exceptions do exist, such as an unexpected weight loss or caregiver stress.  A person able to get out is encouraged to participate in one of the congregate meal sites in the county to enjoy social contact along with a nutritious meal.  All meals follow the most current Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Reservations must be made 24 hours in advance.

Power of Attorney

What is the difference between Power of Attorney, Living Will, and Advance Directives? Which one do I need?

Q: What is the difference between Power of Attorney, Living Will, and Advance Directives? Which one do I need?

A: Everyone should complete a Power of Attorney for both health care and financial decisions while you are of sound mind. This is also known as an advance directive. These documents appoint a person who would serve as your decision making person in the event that you cannot make decisions for yourself. This way you wouldn’t need a guardian. It is a very important to communicate your wishes to the person you appoint in advance.

The “Declaration to Physicians (Wisconsin Living Will)” informs your physician regarding your wishes about life-sustaining measures to be used when you are near death or in a persistent vegetative state. It goes into effect with two physicians agree that your vegetative state cannot be reversed and you are unable to express your health care choices.

A “Power of Attorney for Health Care” is a document in which you appoint another person to make health care decisions for you in the event that you are not capable of making them yourself. This, too, requires that two physicians agree in writing that you cannot express your treatment options to others. You do not need an attorney to complete these two forms.

A “Power of Attorney for Finance and Property” designates power to an individual chosen by you to handle your finanaces and property. Anyone with complex or special assets should ask an attorney for help with this paperwork.

“Authorization for Final Disposition” gives direction for funeral arrangements upon your death.

Volunteer

Are there volunteer opportunities available through the ADRC?

Q: Are there volunteer opportunities available through the ADRC?

A: There are many different opportunities for people to volunteer with the ADRC. Contact your local ADRC and find out what is available. Or if you have a special skill or interest, tell them about it and maybe a new opportunity will be created for you.

How long of a commitment do I have to make to be a volunteer?

Q: How long of a commitment do I have to make to be a volunteer?

A: Any time a volunteer can give is great! Some volunteers help weekly, some only once.